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US Bishops Call for "Fortnight for Freedom" and Challenge to "Unjust Laws"

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WASHINGTON (CNS) -- American Catholics must resist unjust laws "as a duty of citizenship and an obligation of faith," a committee of the U.S. bishops said in a new statement on religious liberty.

Titled "Our First, Most Cherished Liberty," the 12-page statement by the Ad Hoc Committee on Religious Liberty also calls for "a fortnight for freedom" from June 21, 2012, the vigil of the feasts of St. John Fisher and St. Thomas More, to July 4, U.S. Independence Day.

"This special period of prayer, study, catechesis and public action would emphasize both our Christian and American heritage of liberty," the committee said. "Dioceses and parishes around the country could choose a date in that period for special events that would constitute a great national campaign of teaching and witness for religious liberty."

Made public April 12, the document was approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops' Administrative Committee, during its March meeting for publication as a committee statement. The Most Reverend Michael F. Burbidge is a member of the Administrative Committee.

“The challenge we as a people of faith are facing is a serious threat to our fundamental rights as Americans to religious freedom,” Bishop Burbidge said. “This challenge by government bodies must not be allowed to stand. The U.S. bishops are calling on all Americans to make their voices heard on this crucial issue. This is not only a Catholic issue,” Bishop Burbidge said. “If allowed to be carried out, this eroding of our First Amendment right could ultimately lead to the diminishing of other guaranteed rights that we hold dear under the Constitution.”

The ad hoc committee opened its statement with several "concrete examples" of recent threats to religious liberty, saying that "this is not a theological or legal dispute without real-world consequences."

Cited first was the Department of Health and Human Services' mandate that most health plans must include contraception, sterilization and some abortion-inducing drugs free of charge, even if the employer is morally opposed to such services.

Among other examples of "religious liberty under attack" the bishops named:

-- An attempt by the Connecticut Legislature in 2009 to restructure Catholic parishes.

-- Government actions in Boston, San Francisco, the District of Columbia and the state of Illinois that have "driven local Catholic Charities out of the business of providing adoption or foster care services" because the agencies would not place children with same-sex or unmarried heterosexual couples.

-- Changes in federal contracts for human trafficking grants that require Catholic agencies "to refer for contraceptive and abortion services in violation of Catholic teaching."

-- Immigration laws in Alabama and other states that "forbid what the government deems 'harboring' of undocumented immigrants -- and what the church deems Christian charity and pastoral care to those immigrants."

The statement quotes the Founding Fathers and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. to bolster its arguments. Rev. King, writing from jail in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963, described an unjust law as one "that is out of harmony with the moral law," and said he agreed with St. Augustine that "an unjust law is no law at all."

"An unjust law cannot be obeyed," the bishops' statement said. "In the face of an unjust law, an accommodation is not to be sought, especially by resorting to equivocal words and deceptive practices.

"If we face today the prospect of unjust laws, then Catholics in America, in solidarity with our fellow citizens, must have the courage not to obey them," it added. "No American desires this. No Catholic welcomes it. But if it should fall upon us, we must discharge it as a duty of citizenship and an obligation of faith."

The bishops also distinguished between conscientious objection and an unjust law. "Conscientious objection permits some relief to those who object to a just law for reasons of conscience -- conscription being the most well-known example," the committee said. "An unjust law is 'no law at all.' It cannot be obeyed, and therefore one does not seek relief from it, but rather its repeal."

The statement also raised the issue of religious freedom abroad and said "the age of martyrdom has not passed."

The statement called on "American foreign policy, as well as the vast international network of Catholic agencies" to make "the promotion of religious liberty an ongoing and urgent priority."

The bishops assigned special responsibility for advancing religious freedom to several groups:

-- Those who hold public office must "protect and defend those fundamental liberties guaranteed by the Bill of Rights," regardless of their political party.

-- Leaders of Catholic hospitals, universities and social service agencies "who may be forced to choose between the good works we do by faith, and fidelity to that faith itself" were encouraged to "hold firm, to stand fast and to insist upon what belongs to you by right as Catholics and Americans."

In addition to the "fortnight for freedom" June 21 to July 4, the bishops designated the feast of Christ the King -- Nov. 25 this year -- as "a day specifically employed by bishops and priests to preach about religious liberty, both here and abroad."

(CNS – Nancy Frazier)